Wednesday, July 5, 2017

IWSG: Tuning a Piano

It's IWSG day, a monthly event author Alex Cavanaugh started to get writers sharing about insecurities and other stuff going on in their lives. Today's IWSG question is: What is one valuable lesson you've learned since you started writing? I've learned not to compare my journey to other people's journey. I find that some who might appear to be ahead can have the same doubts and insecurities as I do.

Last month, I played a song on my piano after a long piano playing break and I cringed at how creaky and distant the notes sounded. So I hired a piano tuner to come over. I’d actually never gotten around to having the piano tuned before. When the piano tuner was finished working on my piano, I was amazed at how clear and clean the notes sounded. While the piano tuner worked on my piano, I was worried that I would be told that my lack of attention to tuning the piano all this time had permanently damaged the instrument in some way. But all it took was an attentive tuning to return the piano back to shape.

I wonder if the concept of tuning a piano applies to the various interests we have, such as writing. Sometimes I feel quite rusty returning to a writing project after a writing break. I’m sure my words come out creaky and distant sounding, like an untuned piano. As much as I wish I could hire a “tuner” to refine my fiction writing muscle when I’m returning from a break, I know I need to get back on track on my own. But I welcome tips on how to get there. 

9 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Sadly the tuning just takes getting back into the habit of writing. Although hiring someone would be faster!

Madeline Mora-Summonte said...

Would that be nice! Have someone come to our house, tune our creativity. :)

C.D. Gallant-King said...

Now I can't help but question what the piano-tuner equivalent would be for a writer. Some kind of workshop? A furious writing session to loosen up? A harsh critique from an editor? Maybe different people need different things to wake them up.

July IWSG

Pat Hatt said...

Can always hire someone for writing too, but then that costs $1000s for a good one haha best to just sit down and writing away the creakiness

The Silver Fox said...

At first, I was worried that you were going to say that it wasn't your piano that was the problem, and that you had lost your touch, so to speak, from long inactivity!

I was the lead singer in several rock'n'roll bands when I was younger. For a while, though, I didn't sing much at all, not even to the radio, and when I try now I'm frankly not as good. I wonder if it's just age, or if practice would restore me to the way I sounded in my prime, or at least close to it.

Liz A. said...

Perhaps there is a writing "tuner". Wouldn't that be interesting? Someone who could clear out the writing cobwebs and get us back in the swing of writing again.

John Wiswell said...

I would love to hire a writing tuner to get me back into the right pitch after every interruption in my writing schedule!

Tamara Narayan said...

Maybe you can return with a whole new sound. I think of breaks as time to recharge the battery or let ideas fester and grow in the old noggin. Of course, too long of a break can cause problems, such as terrible typing skills among other things.

Nick Wilford said...

I think if you're getting back into playing an instrument, scales and exercises are a good way to start. So maybe you could try some writing exercises and prompts and see what they grow into. Just have a fresh start.

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